In for an inch

 In for an inch often next leads in for a mile. But Alcohol firstly cause permanent personal brain damage, not just the unacceptable fact that Alcohol also now has has the HIGHEST intoxication of ALL consuming  drugs:” The fact is the drug alcohol has the HIGHEST intoxication of ALL drugs (much higher than say meth). That also makes Alcohol the most dangerous drug for both the user/abuser of it and those around the user/abuser of it. Alcohol most dangerous drug for drivers: Recent study. “Driving under the influence of marijuana has a 2X chance of death. Driving just over 0.08 on alcohol has a 40X chance of death. At 0.16 ( its an 80X chance of death according to the same report (I can’t even imagine at 3X what it would be like the well known drunk West Vancouver cop in a BC case). The fact is with the drug alcohol, you can loose the ability to decide if you can drive (i.e. 1st can’t drive, a few more beers, then can fly as all common sense is gone).  It is why the drug alcohol is involved in SO much violence in our society. It is also the biggest date rape drug of them all.” Sadly on top of all that same  people who now do  consume  Alcohol tend often also next  to consume other bad drugs as well, or vice versa. The cycle is continuous. There clearly is no such thing as a little bit pregnant, even the so called moderation next tends to lead to excess, addiction, harm for oneself and many others. As is being done with cigarettes, increasing the consumer costs of the available alcohol is one of the best ways to deal with it   to reduce it’s negative effect. But not the only way. Alcoholics and drug addicts too thus should be terminated from their jobs, and arrested, incarcerated  for any abuse of the laws of the province, country now next too.

 
Showing justice and compassion is rightfully prosecuting all of  the guilty alcohol and drug offenders. It’s also worrying that motorists are continuing to ignore the drink-drive message. ‘The anti-drinking and driving message has to be got across, not just at this time of year but at all times.’

More alcohol use is a concern for health-care professionals, since it means more deaths, illness, injuries and hospital visits, meaning added strain on the health-care system, and additional cost.

 
Paradoxically, despite all the dangers, warnings ,  most people continue to drink beyond safe levels on a weekly basis that is more than 14 units of alcohol for women and 21 units for men. At the heart of this strange contradiction is a false belief, best encapsulated by the former Prime Minister in his introduction to the first national alcohol strategy. In the document, Tony Blair assured readers that “alcohol misuse by a small minority” was responsible for the rising levels of social and health harm. In short, problem drinkers are “other people”, spoiling it for the rest of us. In reality this is not so.. Drinking alcohol  has become too common amongst too many people.
 
It’s also worrying that motorists are continuing to ignore the drink-drive message.
 
Nearly twice as many liquor stores, relatively cheap booze and a pricing system that effectively discounts drinks with more alcohol are contributing to a rise in hazardous drinking, says B.C.’s provincial health officer. The same is true in Alberta and other provinces. A 2003 study found that 79 per cent of youth in school reported drinking at least once by age 17, and 20 per cent of those reported binge drinking three or more days in the previous month. While booze prices have risen in recent years, they have not kept pace with other consumer goods, a trend likely to continue with more competition among stores. Kendall recommends that pricing should reflect alcohol content, with discounts for low-alcohol alternatives and a price premium for stronger drinks. Current pricing creates “clear price incentives for consumers to choose higher-strength alcohol products in all major beverage classes,” As of 2007, government liquor stores accounted for 39 per cent of B.C. sales, with private stores up to 33 per cent. Bars, clubs and restaurants served most of the remainder. B.C.’s biggest average booze consumption occurs in the Interior Health Authority region, which includes the Okanagan and Kootenay regions, at 11 litres of pure alcohol per person per year. Vancouver Island was second at 10.71 litres, and also had the largest increase, 15.2 per cent between 2002 and 2007. Northern Health region was third at 9.73 litres per person, followed by Vancouver Coastal at 8.61 and Fraser, the lowest at 7.03. The Central Coast region of Vancouver Coastal has the highest consumption in the province, 13.69 litres per person in 2007.
 
 A research report providing results from a survey of adult drinking in Northern Ireland has been published .

http://www.bclocalnews.com/bc_north/lakesdistrictnews/news/36589419.html

The survey, conducted on behalf of the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety, examines the amount people drink, when, where and what they drink and who they drink with.

 It also examines how drinking behaviours vary across different sections of the public, the proportion of people who binge drink, problem drinking, and perceptions of drinking.

Key Findings

The key findings relating to the Adult Drinking Patterns Survey in Northern Ireland 2008 are:

* More than seven in ten (72%) adults drink alcohol.

* A larger proportion of males (74%) than females (70%) drink alcohol.

* Most drinking occurs over the weekend and peaks on Saturdays.

* The most common drink consumed is wine (50%), closely followed by beer (48%).

* Most of those who drank in the week prior to the survey had consumed alcohol at home (64%), and nearly one quarter (24%) had consumed alcohol in a pub.

* More than four in five (81%) respondents had exceeded the recommended daily limits during the week prior to the survey.

* Approximately four in five males (79%) and females (83%) exceed their recommended daily limits during the week prior to the survey.

* Nearly one quarter (24%) of respondents drank above the weekly sensible levels.

* Over one quarter (26%) of male respondents and over one fifth (22%) of female respondents drank above the weekly sensible levels in the week prior to the survey.

* Nearly a third (32%) of those who drank in the week before the survey had engaged in at least one binge drinking session.

* Males (35%) were more likely than females (29%) to binge drink.

* Over half (54%) of drinkers aged 18-29 years engaged in at least one binge drinking session in the week prior to the survey, and they are more likely to binge drink than respondents in the older groups.

* One in 10 respondents (10%) of those who drank in the week prior to the survey are highly likely to have a problem with alcohol, according to the CAGE analysis.

* Over half (56%) of those who consumed alcohol in the week prior to the survey considered themselves to be light drinkers, two in five (40%) considered themselves to be moderate drinkers and 4% considered themselves to be heavy drinkers.

Comparisons between 2005 and 2008 are:

* The proportion of adults who drank above the weekly sensible levels in the week prior to the survey significantly decreased from 29% in 2005 to 24% in 2008.

* The proportion of adults who engaged in at least one binge drinking session in the week prior to the survey significantly decreased from 38% in 2005 to 32% in 2008.

 

 

 

 

Attitudes To Alcohol Must Change. A health Minister  has called for a change in attitudes towards alcohol by both the public and the drinks industry all year now too. Statistics which show an increase of in the number of people   binge drinking, getting drunk  and that the statistics also show that we still have a long way to deal with this major problem. 81% of people who choose to drink are still exceeding the recommended daily limits. The cost of alcohol misuse to our society is very real. In just over 10 years, there has been a startling 86% increase in the numbers of people dying due to alcohol related harm. “Now, more than ever, we should all be working together to really tackle this issue head on and I believe the drinks industry has a key role to play. Supermarkets in particular sell alcohol far too cheaply. I am extremely disappointed that despite having met with each of the major supermarkets, and received their personal assurances that they take this matter extremely seriously, those words have not as yet translated into meaningful action. “On the contrary, they are flooded with festive drinks promotions that will only encourage people to indulge further in binge drinking. This, in my view, is totally unacceptable.   Action speaks louder than words. On this occasion, profit is being put before public health.”  “The harsh reality is that although alcohol misuse is known to be damaging and harmful to health and well-being, many people still drink to excess. This must change, and in this respect we all have a collective responsibility in tackling this issue – individuals, society, government and the drinks industry alike.”    http://www.emaxhealth.com/2/63/27952/attitudes-alcohol-must-change.html
 
People are drinking more alcohol in many societies than ever before. In the UK, Ireland, Denmark, and increasingly Australia, young people drink more alcohol than those in the USA, France, and other Mediterranean countries. The way in which adolescents drink in different countries also varies. Frequency of drinking, regular drunkenness, binge drinking, and being drunk before the age of 13 years, are all indicators of an unhealthy pattern of alcohol misuse that is becoming more common. So, for example, 27% of UK 15-year-olds admit to drinking at least five drinks in a row in the past 30 days compared with 22% in 1995; in girls, as many as 29% binge drink. In the USA, 19% of 15-year-olds binge drink. Accidental death, self-harm, suicide, injury, violent behaviour, unprotected sex, alcohol dependence, and liver disease can all result. Nearly half of the alcohol drunk by these young people comes from the family home. Supermarkets, local shops, off-licences, pubs, and clubs provide the rest.  http://madhavgopalkrish.wordpress.com/2008/03/22/more-young-people-drink-more/?referer=sphere_related_content/
 
Reality too many of the binge drinkers., if not already are likely to become hard core alcoholics.
do see also 

 

 

“There’s 60 different ways in which alcohol can c ause premature death and illness,”

 

 

Paradoxically, despite all the dangers, warnings ,  most people continue to drink beyond safe levels on a weekly basis that is more than 14 units of alcohol for women and 21 units for men. At the heart of this strange contradiction is a false belief, best encapsulated by the former Prime Minister in his introduction to the first national alcohol strategy. In the document, Tony Blair assured readers that “alcohol misuse by a small minority” was responsible for the rising levels of social and health harm. In short, problem drinkers are “other people”, spoiling it for the rest of us. In reality this is not so.. Drinking alcohol  has become too common amongst too many people.
 
It’s also worrying that motorists are continuing to ignore the drink-drive message.
 
“Make a choice and stick to it – drink or drive. “Don’t drink and drive,”  If you drive at twice the legal alcohol limit you are at least 30 times more likely to cause a road crash than a driver who hasn’t been drinking. If you plan to drive the only safe option is not to drink. Drivers’ reaction times and motoring skills deteriorate after even a small amount of alcohol – and get worse with increased alcohol consumption. If you are convicted for a drink-driving offence you will have a criminal record, lose your licence for a minimum of one year, may go to prison for up to six months, may have to pay a significant fine  and you may have difficulty hiring a car within 10 years of your conviction. If you are convicted of causing death by careless driving while under the influence of drink you face up to 14 years in prison, an unlimited fine and a minimum two-year driving ban. Other consequences include:
-facing exceptionally high insurance costs once you get your licence back.
-loss of a job (15 per cent of those convicted do), legal expenses and loss of personal transport and increased travel expenses.
-living with the knowledge that your irresponsibility has caused death, injury or severe distress to innocent people.

 

 see also https://thefocusonthefamily.wordpress.com/2008/11/15/more-booze-taxes-lower-alcohol-linked-deaths/

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